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do. >> last month, epa administrator gina mccarthy testified before the house science committee on the agencies will science and technology activities. the committee examine the policy of transparency practices on clean air and water acts and hydraulic fracturing or cracking. we bring you that kerry now. i'm not [inaudible conversations] >> to commit inside space and technology will come to order. welcome, everyone to today's hearing entitled strengthening transparency and accountability within the environmental protection agency. we're going to recognize myself or fitness for a doping statement and then i'll recognize the ranking member for hers. the environmental protection agency like every other governmental institution should answer to the american people. everyone agrees we need to protect the environment, but we should do so in a way that is open and honest. democracy requires transparency and accountability. yet epa's justification for regulation are cloaked in secrecy i asked. it appears the epa been a lot of stretches of science to justify its own object disappeared am
that we understand how to answer those issues effective from a science perspective, and in a way that continues to maintain the availability of inexpensive natural gas that strengths the economy as well as help us reduce air emission. >> i appreciate that. i think it seems like a reasonable response. someone who asked you environmental law far long time. please, do what you can to work with the administration. so we don't have overlapping of potentially inconsistent regulations. very frustrating for the public. we want it to be done responsibly and in a way people can understand. thank you for being here. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, mr. peters. >> the gentle mab from arizona. >> thank you. i only had two things i wanted to walk through. everyone in the committee with us here yesterday. i'm sorry, you're going hear the same stheem again. the large data bases that are used particularly in things like pm10 which is a big deal in the desert, southwest we have the thing called dirt. without grass on it. so it really does affect our lives. down to the individual -- because
science in the world. we want to understand how life works at the detailed levels and apply that in terms of coming up with new insights to prevent and treat disease. >> we support tens of thousands of grants across the country conducted by the world's most cutting-edge scientist in the united states who are working on cancer, aids and other drugs. we are on a roll but there is a bit of an issue with the cuts. >> let's learn about the history. your roots date back to the late 1700s. but you were formed in 1887 as part of the department of health and human services. what is your budget and how many people work for nih? >> the current budget is about $29 billion. the number of people that work on the campus is about 17,000. most of the work is done by grants we give to the institutions across the country and globally. 85% is spent there in the universities where you are hearing about medical breakthroughs. >> how long have you been with nih? >> i came here 20 years ago, steve. asked to come lead the human genome project. in 2003, they laid out all three letters of the dna instruction book w
never do that. you don't destroy the science to get to the headline. >> you don't distort the science to get to the headline. it you want to follow more of that issue, i recommend an amicus brief. i was involved in with it with the professor in which we recruited a number of distinguished scientists. we could have used more. and attempted so simply explain what the relevant issues on court junk dna were. but the court used it in the opinion nonetheless. it's an interesting brief, and easily obtained so the idea of the scientific safe guards then was those being used were not revealing much more than identity. it was sort of the basic end of the brief as well. privacy laden use of dna. statutes can be changed. supreme court clearly rejected the view in king by saying that once the statutes are in place, we will give a presumption they are followed. what is left after king? one issue is the balancing work the same in cases that are not, quote, seriouses offense. at least four times in the king opinion you see the phrase serious offense never defined. is it descriptive? if it's vital to
labs. andft the area of research am now pursuing a career in science policy. i am working with a public education advocacy group in the district. i was wondering if you have any suggestions for early career scientists. how should we keep moving forward in these next couple of years? it is going to remain tough, even if we reach some sort of a deal. are the voice that i am most concerned about. i am glad you are moving in science policy. we need expertise there. many people in your situation would like to continue to do research and are finding it challenging to identify the path forward for them to do so. nih, we're doing everything we can to provide that kind of support. we are increasing the grants that are a bridge between a postdoctoral fellowship and an independent faculty position. we are making it possible for individuals that come in for their first nih grant application to only compete against each other instead of the established investigators that may have more of a track record. trying to give first-time investigators a leg up. thatl have to recognize while this is a histori
been credited with new breakthroughs in the study of medical science, including aids and mental health. this morning on the "washington journal" we want to focus on the nih and give you an opportunity to find out more about the agency. francis s. collins joins us live. >> it is great to be here. >> you are the director of the nih. what is your objective? guest: we are the largest searcher -- researcher in the world. we focus on how life works at the most detailed level, and partly to apply that and come up with new insights that will prevent and treat disease. we support tens of thousands of grants across the country, conducted by our world's most cutting-edge scientists who are working from everything from cancer, to hiv-aids, two timers -- o all alzheimer's. you name it. we want to talk more about that, in terms of sequestration. you form to this as part of the department of health and human services. what is your budget? how many people work for the and age? billion.9 the number of people who work for us focus on the work that we do from the grants that we give across the country, a
and i in love not only with the concept of discovery and science that has to do with health but the extraordinary electricity of atmosphere here at the nih. new york for a year to complete the training as a en came back here senior scientist and have been here ever since. place.n extraordinary and diversity and interaction and communication is sometimes jokewe around but it isn't a joke. i would do it for nothing if i opportunity. it's such an exciting experience. appreciate the chance to talk to you and other experts on show our audience going there. this past week president talking aids aids as part of world day and another $1 million in aids resoeufplt here's what the had to saeufplt i want your reaction afterwards. announcedd aids day i drug llion for the aids assistance program which help people pay for life saving medications. was so ime the need great that over 9,000 people were on the wait list. vowed to get those numbers down. as of last week we have cleared the wait list. to zero and we'll it back.ing to get [applause] so we're making progress. we we're all here to
a decade or two of really getting the kind of science we needed to make that case and to understand the brain as being the basis of both normal and abnormal behavior. host: the president talking about the brain initiative, calling this the next major american project -- what is he talking about? guest: to put that into context, he was thinking about the last two great american projects in science. one was the apollo project to put a man on the moon. and then the human genome project. the next great american project is what he is calling the brain initiative. and that is an initiative that will involve several government agencies, among them nih and the defense advanced research project agency and the national science foundation as well as private partners to take our understanding of the brain and how it works and bring it up a notch. try to figure out a way to develop the tools to decode the language of the brain. we have gone a long way recently, but we knew -- need to go much further much faster to understand the basis of how the brain works and how it sometimes does not work so
courage and enormous strength as well as he challenged us all to not just acknowledge the science of climate change, do understand that it is real and happening, but to also charge the cabinet to take immediate action. call me biased, but i believe it was his best speeches so far, although he is not done yet, i'm quite sure. climated through his action plan as well, which outlined some common sense, pragmatic steps that the epa and other agencies across the toinistration are now taking cut carbon pollution, invest in clean energy, to help our cities and towns build in more resilient ways so that they can add depth to a changing climate and keep our communities safe, but also to prepare to be a broader and more vocal leader on the issue of climate change in international discussions. as you know, in september, epa proposed urban pollution standards for new power plants using our authority that congress gave us under the clean air act. those power plant labor --ations our proposals regulations are proposals that would impact new facilities being constructed. new would ensure any fac
developments, in developments that include both science as well as the legal profession helping to decide which of these developments are great and how how can we best use them? one of the things i really enjoy about talking to groups of judges is that you have, this group has the collective wisdom to help figure out how we can use this information, use this information to its best possible purposes and of course to avoid any potential harmful outcomes so i would like to thank you for your attention this morning. i've a happy to address any questions. [applause] >> we have time for two or three questions. please come up to the microphones to the front and remember you will be immortalized on c-span. >> taking swabs and telling what your future medical problems are. how accurate are those predictions and is it worth the money? >> that is a great question. the question is about so-called direct consumer testing where you send a saliva sample into a company. they type your dna using what we call a dna chip and you get back a lot of information about your approximate ancestry and about your risk fo
a gun out of plastic. it was science fiction but in the last few years that science fiction has become a reality. 3-d printers, a technology overall that is miraculous. 3-d printers can create car parts at a much cheaper price, create a trachea for a baby so it can live. but they can also create plastic guns. and now technology allows them to be sold for $1,000, a little more than $1,000, so just about anyone can get one; certainly a terrorist intent on doing evil. so the ban takes on new urgency, and today there's good news and bad news. the good news is that the house of representatives has passed a bill to extend that ban for ten years. the bad news is the dangerous loophole i mentioned is still in the bill. under existing law, the law that expires tonight, you can make one of these undetectable guns perfectly legal by simply attaching a removable piece of metal to the handle, and then you could have the gun, have it be legal at the last moment when you wanted to slip it somewhere where it could be very dangerous, you remove the metal part and make the gun invisible to the metal det
science monitor. walden,esentative greg on to make haitians and technology. communications and technology. >> a several live events to tell you about tomorrow morning. treasury secretary jack lew will be at the future will trust to discuss the state of financial reform. also on c-span2, members of the house and energy commerce subcommittee on energy and power will hear from energy regulatory commissioners. span330 eastern a.m. on c- we cover a hearing on unemployment benefits that are set to expire at the end of the month. >> from age eight, betty ford, then betty [inaudible] put on skits and plays and that led to eddington, vermont where she studied at the school of dance. these are some of her notecards. no bookstworks -- where she kept cards. she carried this with her to vermont, back to grand rapids, off to new york where she studied with martha graham and work with the powers modeling agency and back to grand rapids again. you will find a host of things that you would find in just about any organizer. brochures on dance costumes, one of her sketches of a costume for one of the dance
to be taken care of. this isn't science fiction anymore. now, undetectable firearms have always been around since the days of world war ii. it was clearly a present danger. that's why in 19 both parties got together to pass it and it's been extended since then. but it is no longer science fiction that somebody can just make a gun in their basement, basically obliterating the utility of all of our nation's firearms laws and use it to perpetrate great evil throughout this cannes. -- throughout it country. 3-d printers cost only about $2,000 today. most futurists are pretty certain that in maybe a decade or more, most americans will have access to this technology, just like the photocopier and the personal computer seemed out of reach at some point for most middle-class americans. maybe today the 3-d printer is but in a decade or more it might just be another household appliance that sits right next to your computer printer. second, we know how dangerous plastic guns are, because people have tested this premise. one investigative journalist in israel took a plastic gun into the israeli parliam
. the science gives us great reason for optimism. there are currently more than 30 safe and effective antiviral drugs and drug combinations. researchers continue to develop new treatments. what is more, we're making significant progress toward new medications and regimens that are longer lasting and simpler to use. with far fewer side effects. those regular min reduce the amount of hiv in the body. which helps people living with hiv stay healthy and live longer. and we also know from the nih funding research that hiv traps suggestion is drastically reduced when the amount of hiv virus in an infected person is reduced to undetectable leaflets. meanwhile partner agency at the fda has approved new rapid diagnostic test that can be used in a variety of settings to identify hiv infected individuals who might not be tested in traditional health care settings. now as we speak, nih grant ees and scientists are exploring way to treat hiv infection by administrating hiv antibiotic. and they have begun early stage human testing of an antibody that was effective in producting human cells against more than
a doomsday science that wallows in pessimism. they recalled when they describe intelligence, he evokedded memory of when he was milking a cow on the farm down in the river as a young nan, and he said he would get the basket still with pure milk, and the cow would relieve itself in the milk, and president johnson said the release, and he meant that in a bad way, that was intelligence. so you -- [laughter] you can imagine how that hurt our feelings. [laughter] there's another metaphor that i hear, the famous comment that we, in the intelligence community, like to provide options to policymakers, and so we look out at the world an say we are at the cross roads. one path leads to death and destruction, and the other path leads to total annihilation. we hope you policymakers will be able to have the wisdom to choose the right course. [laughter] in fact, in my experience and experience i think we relate today on the bulcans is it is when it works well, a collaborative enterprise with vast capabilities to bring to the fight, but also with clear limitations to be understood by leaders who know th
of the way the transition system operates in the science cost and i'm concerned that under order 1,000, ferc is defining the benefits so broadly into spreading the cost so wisely that the simple action has no meaning anymore. chairwoman lafleur, please explain the idea of the beneficiary pay and what that should mean and keep in mind i don't want my constituents. i know you can't address the merits of the individual complaints filings under the 1,000 but there is a leave of the point i would like to raise with you that i think stands on its own which i hope you will be able to respond. >> thank you congressman. the order 1,000 required to plan cooperatively across the region as the region encompassing pennsylvania already does. and take into account three kinds of benefits. reliability benefits, which can be hard to quantify that are very real, the needing public policy requirements to connect to resources that the states require them to connect which are normally identified by the states such as pennsylvania which is a renewable portfolio standard, and a third congestion benefits to reduce
. hosted by the christian science monitor. this is just over one hour. >> our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. this is her first visit with the group. she got an early look at the joys of helping children learn since her mother was a teacher. she earned degrees from cornell university and a law degree from cardozo school of law. she worked at a wall street law firm for several years. she taught history in brooklyn while serving as counsel for the president of the united federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as aft president in 2008. that ends the biographical portion of the program. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging or tweeting or other means of filing well this is underway. there is no embargo on the breakfast. our friends at c-span have agreed not to air video of the session until one hour after the breakfast is over to give reporters time to file. give me a nonthreatening signal and i will call on one and all. low on the subtleties scale, but nonthreatening anyway. the n
all source analysts and combining these capabilities management,ion targeting, science and technology, bring to bear significant capability and these types off skills and capabilities, and others, they all brought of aneath the construct center concept. the integrated intelligence center construct, uniquely tied into our war fighting combat in and commands, part of the defense intelligence enterprise, provided full spectrum intelligence, synchronizing capabilities and eliminating redundancies. i will not stand here until you we will eliminate every redundancy, but i will tell you, it is one of the areas we have to try to work toward. understanding who is doing what to whom. as a longtime intelligence officer, you meet the demands of your customer. your customer is a commander. customerustom-made -- is the secretary of defense for the present, you answer that question. somebody else answers it for their boss, so be it. if somebody wants a call that redundant, so be it. inis the world we live in dealing with the here and now and the threats we face today and to keep us out of conflict,
their role that way. this is not to say that law is a science or a mechanical enterprise. you obviously know that it is not. we disagree on many things. sometimes we disagree incredible -- we disagree in predictable ways that follow in our own theories of how to interpret the law, constitution, statutes. all of those are so different in thinking about policy and the way people in the clinical branches do. -- in the political branches do. that was when i was in my 30s. it was a different role. it was a different set of responsibilities. as a judge, i think about law and what i am doing and what i am called upon to do in a very different way. of all the things in my life that affect what i'm doing now, i honestly think that affected the least. one thing that i bring to the i guess table from those years is an understanding of how certain political processes work. sometimes it is relevant to particular cases that we may hear because of course, we do review a lot of executive branch decision-making. but other than that, the ways of thinking and the goals of what you are doing are pretty divergen
never told us very much. she's also a senior fellow for science and international affairs committee member of the policy board. she cofounded the center for the new american security think tank that you all know and she is a member of the aspen strategy group. so, zelikow is a professor of history at the university of virginia and is also the dean leading the graduate school of arts and sciences. >> i'm going to put that on my resume. i like that. soon after they became a trial and appellate lawyer in texas doing for mobile justice and civil rights work. there is so much more here. he was an adviser to secretary of state condoleezza rice. when i first met him, the council of the department of state he's a member of the president's intelligence advisory board and he was for president bush and president obama and he has written a number of books. germany unified. statecraft is a good one. he wrote that with condoleezza rice and most importantly he is a member of the aspen strategy group that he directed from 2,000 to 2003. i will sort by asking michele and fill up a few questions and
work will have to be done in and significant resources devoted to the areas of science and technology, including research and development. government is also convinced that organised labour is an important partner whose cooperation is crucial for the reconstruction and development of our country. that partnership requires, amongst other things, that our labour law be reformed so that it is in line with international standards, apartheid vestiges are removed and a more harmonious labour relations dispensation is created, on the basis of tripartite cooperation between government, labour and capital. the government is determined forcefully to confront the scourge of unemployment, not by way of handouts but by the creation of work opportunities. the government will also deal sensitively with the issue of population movements into the country, to protect our workers, to guard against the exploitation of vulnerable workers and to ensure friendly relations with all countries and peoples. the government is also taking urgent measures to deal firmly with drug trafficking some of which is carri
in ottawa. general lawson graduated from the military college of canada with a bachelor of science degree as well as a master of science in the electrical can engineering and while attending the u.s. armed forces command staff college in montgomery, alabama, he completed a masters of public administration in at auburn. so he's thoroughly educated, i think it's fair to say. drawing on that record of service and expertise, general lawson has agreed to share his thoughts on the u.s./canadian defense relationship. secretary hagel just last week called this relationship one of the strongest in the world and, indeed, our canadian friends have fought alongside american troops in the volatile kandahar province in afghanistan at the height of the conflict, and they continue to deploy some 950 troops this a training capacity near kabul. just this past friday, they signed the canada/u.s. asia-pacific cooperation framework to increase our security cooperation in this important region. this will be done in the framework of the canada/u.s. joint board of defense. this is the context in which general la
, a not-for-profit think tank in the washington dc area that focuses on the issues of science and technology and how science and technology is changing our society for almost 17 years now we have been the host at home for the international terrorism studies have it up by professor yonah alexander and i think most people here would agree and understand that the center that yonah heads up is one of the most for most academic institutions and consortium of institutions in the world focusing on all aspects of terrorism. professor alexander blank group has looked up, studied and published documents on every conceivable realm and aspect of terrorism for many, many years and is personally and author of over 100 books on the subject and we are quite proud here at the potomac institute could be the home of his academic efforts. we are also privileged to partner with the international law institute and representing them as he always has and is the chairman of the international institute and for well over a decade we have partnered with professor wallace to bring to you these seminars an
in the head of the american federation of teachers spoke with reporters at the christian science monitor. here is a bit of what she had to say. >> today is like the day after pizza they. so i'm sure that most of you filed some stories about pisa and the sky falling in things like that although i haven't actually seen much of that. actually, a lot of really good reporting under the numbers and i just want to thank all of you for that. and, you know, we have been through this before. this is the third or fourth time, the fourth time in my memory, but the fourth or the fifth time that pisa results have invested in the united states. but what does this say that the united states is pretty much in the middle of the pack on mathematics, science and english and particularly this year where there was a focus on mathematics for the first time in ten years. it says two or three things. number one, it says that things like poverty, social economics really matter because you look at the states like massachusetts and connecticut that did well and what they've done and you look at the data when you pull it
is an cozy a syt four and six sick science in the kumble justice system. from colorado springs colorado, this is an hour and a half. >> with experience with the microphone -- okay. how's this? great. good morning everyone. it's a pleasure to be here today i would like to thank the organizers for inviting me to come to this beautiful place i would like to talk with you this morning at hank mentioned we would start with a very basic review of dna. what is dna, how does it work and why should you be interested in it. our focus on an important intersection between the dna and the law and that isn' is a diffe of genetics, genetics conference of applications and illustrate some of the points that with the case studies in which the dna has been used in for the context. so, our body is a marvelous collection of about 100 trillion cells. and inside almost all of these cells in the nucleus of the cell's here we can find dna. the dna is organized among chromosomes. we absorb these under a microscope and if we look three closely at these chromosomes, we see this double helix structure, the classic
medical condition. the science gives us great reason for optimism and hope. there are currently more than already safe and effective antiretrovirals drugs and combinations. researchers continue to develop new treatments. more, we're making progress to new medications and regimens that are longer lasting and simpler to use. far fewer side effects. those regimens reduce the amount of hiv in the body. that helps people living with hiv to stay healthy and live longer. we also know from the nih funding research, hiv transmission is drastically reduced when the amount of hiv virus in an affected person is reduced to undetectable levels. ,eanwhile, our partner agency the fda, has approved new, rapid diagnostic test which can be used in a variety of settings to identify hiv in an infected individual. it might not be tested in a traditional health care setting. as we speak, nih grantees and scientists are exploring ways to treat hiv infections by administering anti-hiv antibodies. they have begun early-stage testing of an antibody that was effective in protecting human cells against more than any
of the social sciences research network. the third witness is simon lazarus senior counsel with the accountability center. he's a member of the administrative conference of the united states and during his career he served as the public policy counsel for the national senior citizens law center as a partner at powell goldstein and associate director of president carter white house domestic policy staff. mr. lazarus has written articles that appeared in journals as well as publications such as the atlantic, the "washington post" and the new republic. our final witness is michael cannon of the health policy studies. he has been recognized as an influential expert on the affordable care act. mr. cannon has appeared on abc, cbs, cnn and fox news and has written articles that have been featured in numerous newspapers including "the wall street journal," usa today and the "los angeles times." he is also the coeditor of a book on replacing the portable care act and the co-author of a book on healthcare reform. i would like to thank all of the witnesses today. each of the written s
in the history of the social science research network. our third witness is simon lazarus, a senior counsel with the constitutional accountability center. he is a member of the administrative conference of its eight. he has served as the public counsel for the national senior citizens law center. mr. lazarus has written articles appeared in law journals as well as publications such as "the atlantic," "the washington post," and "the new republic." our final institute -- witness has been recognized as an influential expert on the affordable care act. cannon has appeared on abc, cbs, cnn and fox news and has that have beens featured in numerous newspapers 6 c1 journal, usa today and the los angeles times. he is the coeditor of a book on replacing the affordable care act and the co-author of a book on health care reform. i would like to thank all of the witnesses for their appearance today. each of your written statements entered into the record in its entirety. i ask that each witness summarize his or her testimony in five minutes or less. there is a timing light on your table. when the light
by bigger and bigger storms would need to focus on the science of communities. i would also propose we strengthen the emergency response capacity of the local mission. i know ms. steele has been strong the development aspect of supportive of the construction efforts that have gone there. i don't think they have the team and staff to respond to a three to five-year effort that's going to be there and i would say we look at mechanisms to assist her in her step in responding over the longer-term in assisting filipinas and developing. i will say it has been mentioned before, the filipino community has been quick to respond. it varies billion, very proud people and caring people and the government now is winding up in moving forward. recent leadership from the u.s., which i think they would welcome, they would be positioned well for the future. thank you. >> thank you so very much for the tremendous job catholic relief services is doing. we were fully briefed by joe curry while we were there and tom o'reilly took his bitterly around. we got to see the operation upfront and was extremely imp
do to the our economy, secure life. with a look at this as a very real threat. no matter how science fiction it is to think about that happening. it could easily happen. it's our job to stop it. >> host: representative hunter, iran has not ended and f the country for more than 200 just. they have a right to defend themselves. what do you say to that argument? >> guest: iran has invaded other countries do proxy terrorist the they're in syria, ma lebanon. they are in a lot of places doing bad things. they are in afghanistan. so they haven't invaded because that's not what these countries do. what these countries do is when i say countries, countries like afghanistan, prewar, and iran, they have proxy care. they fund, promote and train at actors in their state and then send them out to other countries to destabilize those countries. >> host: front page of "the new york times," i don't know if you saw this story. jihadists groups gain internal across the middle peace. >> guest: that's true. in fact, iraq and syria, ma especially because what you have is this. you have a rat line from syr
are the aol and compuserve in this story. now that said, it's actually quite a difficult computer science challenge to build a distributed social system that works in a timely manner. and we know this because it used to exist. net news, if anyone was using the internet in the 1990s, they'll remember that. and, essentially, it was a social media discussion system that was based on open standards. but it was rather slow, and it quickly became rather unwieldily. the volume of traffic passing through it was really too big, and a lot of isps didn't want to get involved with it. there's clearly a lot of technical challenges that would need to be overcome for this to happen. but i'm keeping a very close eye on efforts like dias pa -- diaspora. there seems to be a new one every few months to create an open standard for social networking. the same could happen to to facebook and twitter in the next decade. >> host: but whatever form social media takes in the future, you write, one thing is clear, it is not going away as this book has argued. social media is not new. it has been around for centurie
is a better term, and industry science-based? >> i appreciate that question a great deal. the answer is we have put in place a number of new policy components that will begin to allow us to cover the entire. and it. i don't think we'll ever find the time when the american health sector diminishes in terms of imports and its reliance on technology. we are technologically driven in this country and that is a great asset in many respects, but a liability as well. it is an asset in that we've allowed the most technological means to be used in some cases that it made a difference. some people confuse our technology with our system, our marketplace. we have the best in the world. but we don't have the best sector in the world if you look at any performance criteria. i think we're the best technology in the world. a lot of people around the world want to access that technology. succumb to the united states to be able to do that. but what this law does and what i think a growing consensus, even in the private sector outside the law acknowledges that if we are really going to make a difference in t
do to a security wise. we have to look at this is a very real threat no matter how science fiction does to think about that happening. it could easily happen and it's our job to stop it. >> colon the gene tweets in represented hunter iran has not invaded another country for more than 200 years. they have a right to defend themselves. what do you say to that argument? >> guest: iran has invaded other countries through proxy terrorists. they are in a whole lot of places doing bad things. they are in afghanistan so they haven't invaded because that is not with these countries do. with these countries do is end when i say countries i'm in countries like afghanistan prewar and iran have proxy wars and a fund to promote and train bad actors in their state bad bad actors in their state and send them out to other countries to destabilize those countries and kill and maim people. husk of the front page of "the new york times" and don't know if you saw this story. groups gain in turmoil across the mideast. violence has presented new opportunities for jihadist groups across the middle east to
does it say that the united states is pretty much in the middle of the pack on mathematics, science and english? and particularly this year where there was a real focus on mathematics for the first time in ten years. it says two or three things. number one, it says that things like poverty, socioeconomics really matter because you look at the states like massachusetts and connecticut that did well and what they've done, and you look at the data when you pull it out and try to account for poverty, and you see where the statistics are. but there's more to this, because if you just stop there, we're in the inane debate that we've been in for the last 20 years. be because th issue is not whether poverty matters, but what do we do about it? so the dominant strategying with, educational -- strategy, educational strategy that we've done about it for the last ten years is no child left behind and race to the top. there's been a wunsch of other thing -- bunch of other things like charters and competition and now new standards, but that's the hypertesting, the sanctioning of teachers, the clo
point. it's protruding new coal-fired generation in this country spent the science that tells us we've got to reduce carbon pollution and the economics are telling us the exact same thing. and about the state of florida where now taxpayers will have to invest and are already investing huge sums of money to begin to adapt to a changing climate. think about the huge bills, the bills that come to every time have an extreme weather event, whether it's drought or super storms. and i would think that the utility industry also sees the writing on the wall, they're looking for the certainty and the more aggressive we are moving away from carbon intensive energy generation, the better. thank you very much. ..e gentleman from west virginia mr. mckinley for five minutes. >> chairman lafleur, perhaps you can give me some direction on this. we have a growing problem in west virginia with the various constituents. currently a lot of it has to be shipped. a lot of it is being wasted which is a shame. that doesn't benefit the consumer and doesn't help the environment any. my question is what i am h
. >> the science and the economics as well tells us we've got to reduce carbon pollution and the economics are telling us the exact same thing you think about the state of florida where now the tax payers have to invest in are already investing huge sums of money to begin to adapt to a changing climate. think about the huge bill, the bills that come due every time we have an extreme weather events whether it is a drought or super storm. i would think that utility industry also sees the writing on the wall if they are looking for that certainty and the more aggressive we are on moving away from the carbon intensive energy generation, the better. >> the gentle ease time is expired. this time recognize the gentleman from west virginia mr. mckinley for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. chairman lafleur perhaps you can give me some direction on this. we have a growing problem in west virginia with the production of the various constituents with ngl that we can't use this as only the local market. it has to be shipped. currently a lot of it is just wasted which is a shame and doesn't ben
with science, being in an environment like this where i could explore whatever i could become passionate about. it was a fantastic opportunity. it actually got me out of clinical research and ultimately into doing more basic neuroscience . i spent 20 years looking at the doing thats -- research. and i came back to the nih. host: we have a call from missouri. good morning. caller: thank you for c-span. i finished two books by caroline leaf. i do not know whether she is a psychologist or psychiatrist. but her books are on thoughts and what enters the brain. i just find it really hard to stay with this problem because i have got a lot of problems with hate. and all of the information i see on television seems to be trytive information, and i to eliminate all of that. but it is almost impossible. all the wars. i mean, i am so happy that you have this program on this morning. i am going to hang up and listen to the program. thank you very much. host: thank you for the call. guest: by the way, i would like to make one remark. i am so delighted to have you here at nih. but i would not want your viewe
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